Tag Archives: Arduino

LESSON 29: The Dos and Don’ts of Arduino Software Interrupts

This is a follow on to lesson 28, to address some of the questions that come up. It is important to understand that all functions are not well suited for use with software interrupts. You must be mindful of timing. Key to being successful with Arduino Software Interrupts is the function called needs to be small and very fast. When the interrupt calls the function, you need to get in and out of that function as quick as you can. Hence, you should avoid doing printing in the function called by the interrupt. You should try and avoid working with serial data, because things can get lost if you are not careful. Also, you should know that you can not use a delay in the function.

For most beginner programmers, interrupts should just be used to call short functions, with minimal lines of code, that can be run quickly.

Comparing the Arduino, Raspberry Pi Model 2, and Beaglebone Black

In this video we do a head to head comparison of the Arduino, Raspberry Pi Model 2, and the Beaglebone black. We compare the pros and cons of each platform and discuss how to decide which platform to learn on and which is best for different types of projects.

You can pick up the gear discussed in this video below:

Arduino: This is a great place to start, and the device is very affordable.

Sparkfun Inventor Kit: Everything you need to learn microcontroller programming and circuits. This is the kit we use in our Arduino Lessons, and even includes the Arduino.

Raspberry Pi Kit: This kit has everything you need to follow along on our Raspberry Pi Lessons.

Raspberry Pi: If you already have the cords and cables, you can buy just the Raspberry Pi.

Beaglebone Black: We are not working on a series of lessons showing you how to use the Beaglebone Black. Now would be a good time to go ahead and order your Beagle.

I hope you enjoyed this video lesson, and hope you will jump in and take our lessons on using the Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and the Beaglebone Black

Python with Arduino LESSON 17: Sending and Receiving Data Over Ethernet

Arduino Ethernet
This circuit contains an Arduino Nano and Pressure Sensor Communicating over Ethernet

In LESSON 16 we showed a simple Client Server model that allows us to send strings between Python running on a PC and the arduino over Ethernet. That lesson simply passed strings back and forth to show a very basic Server on Arduino, and Python acting as the Client. In this lesson we show a more practical example, with the Arduino connected to an Adafruit BMP180 Pressure Sensor. In order to complete this lesson, you will need an Arduino, an Ethernet Shield, and the Pressure Sensor. If you do not have this particular pressure sensor, you can probably follow along in the lesson using whatever sensor you have that is of interest. The video will take you through the tutorial step-by-step, and then the code we developed is shown below.

The key issue in getting this project to work is to get your mac address and IP address from your router or network. If you are at school, simply speak to your network administrator, and he will help you get an IP address for your arduino. If you are at home, you will need to connect to your router from a browser, and configure it to assign an IP address and agree on a mac address for your arduino. Some arduino Ethernet shields have a sticker with a mac address. If your Ethernet shield has a sticker with mac address, use that one. If it does not, you will need to come up with a unique mac address. There are thousands of possible routers and networks out there, so I can not help you with that part. But if you look in the router documentation, you should be able to get the IP address and mac address worked out. The arduino itself does not have a hard wired mac address, but you set the mac address in the arduino software, and the IP address as well. The key thing is that the mac address is unique on your network, and the router and arduino agree on the IP address and mac address. If you have a clearer way to explain this, please leave a comment below.

This is the server side software to run on the arduino. Again, you should use a suitable IP address and mac address for your network. Do not think you can just copy the ones I use in the code below.

Once you have this on your arduino, and the arduino connected to the internet via an Ethernet cable, you can test by opening a command line in Windows. Then ping the address you have assigned to the Arduino. If it pings correctly and you get a reply, you are ready to develop the Python code. The Python will be the client. It will send the requests to the Arduino, and the Arduino will respond with data. Since our circuit can measure pressure or temperature, you can request either of those. When the arduino receives a request for temperature, it will go out, make the temperature measurement and then return the data to Python. Similarly, if you request Pressure the arduino will read the request, will make the Pressure measurement, and then return pressure reading to the client (Python).

 This python code will request Temperature, will then read the response, and then will print the data. It then requests Pressure, reads the response, and then prints it. If you look at our earlier lessons you can see graphical techniques to visually present the data. The hard part is getting the data passed back and forth, which we show how to do in this lesson.

Python with Arduino LESSON 15: Configuring and Using the Xbee Radios

This lesson describes how to program the Xbee Series 1 radios. It will work with either the standard Series 1 (S1) or the Series 1 Pro models. The Pro radios are higher power and will give greater range, but they cost more. The radios are configured using X-CTU software, which can be downloaded here.  The video gives step by step instructions on how to configure and use the radios to communicate wirelessly over the serial port. Lesson 14 gives information on the hardware needed. Lessons 1-13 sill show you how to communicate between Python and Arduino if you need to get caught up on basic serial communication and interfacing arduino and python. The techniques provided in the video above, however, should work for just about any arduino project where you want to communicate between two arduinos, an arduino and PC, or between two PCs.

LESSON 27: Instrument Package

In this lesson we bring together a lot of the material from the first 26 lessons to create an instrument package that could be deployed in a demonstration project. We will wire wrap up an Arduino Nano, a Virtuabotix SD card reader, and the Adafruit Ultimate GPS to create a system that will track and log position and altitude, and save the data in a format that can be displayed on Google Earth.

Wire Wrapping
Wire Wrapping tools and Perforated Board

You will want to place the Adafruit GPS, the SD Card Reader, and the Arduino Nano into a perf board.  Then, you will want to carefully wire wrap the components as follows:

Connecting the Adafruit Ultimate GPS Unit to Arduino
GPS Pin Arduino Pin
Vin 5V
GND GND
RX Pin 2
TX Pin 3

 

Connecting the SD Card Reader
Sd Card Reader Pin Arduino Pin Details
GND GND Common Ground
3.3 V – (NOT USED)
+5 5V Power
CS 4 Chip Select
MOSI 11 SPI Data
SCK 13 Clock
MISO 12 SPI Data
GND GND Common Ground

 

Now the code you developed in LESSON 26 should run on this prototype. The code creates a Google Earth friendly set of coordinates. Just put a KML wrapper on the coordinates as described in LESSON 26.  Putting it all together, I took the system outside and walked around, and this is the data track I got.

GPS Track
GPS track generated by my wire wrapped prototype